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CITES Full Form

CITES Full Form |CITES Convention |CITES Since 1975

CITES Full Form ” stands for the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora.

  • Certainly! The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) is an international agreement between governments. Its primary goal is to ensure that international trade does not threaten the survival of wild animals and plants.

CITES Full Form

CITES was established in 1973 and is legally binding for the countries that have become parties to the convention. Currently, there are 183 member countries, making it one of the most widely adopted international conservation agreements.

The main objective of CITES is to regulate and monitor the international trade of endangered species.

It aims to prevent the exploitation of these species and promote their sustainable use.

The convention achieves this by placing restrictions and controls on the import, export, and sale of endangered animals and plants and their parts or derivatives.

CITES classifies species into three appendices based on their conservation status and the level of protection they require:

CITES Full Form

Appendix I: CITES Full Form

Includes species threatened with extinction. Trade in these species is highly regulated, and commercial trade is generally prohibited.

Appendix II:CITES Full Form

Includes species that are not necessarily threatened with extinction but may become so if trade is not controlled. Trade in these species is regulated through permits and quotas to ensure sustainability.

Appendix III:CITES Full Form

Includes species that are protected in at least one country and require cooperation from other member countries to control their trade effectively.

  • Member countries are responsible for implementing CITES regulations within their jurisdictions. They establish management authorities and scientific authorities to issue permits, monitor trade, and enforce the convention’s provisions.

CITES has played a crucial role in conserving endangered species and combatting illegal wildlife trade. It has contributed to the protection of iconic species such as elephants, rhinos, tigers, and many others. By regulating international trade and promoting collaboration among member countries, CITES aims to ensure the long-term survival of wild animals and plants for future generations.

CITES UPSC (CITES Full Form)

  • If you are referring to “CITES” in the context of UPSC (Union Public Service Commission) in India, there is no direct connection between the two.
  • UPSC is the central recruiting agency responsible for conducting various competitive examinations for recruitment into the Indian civil services, including the prestigious Indian Administrative Service (IAS), Indian Police Service (IPS), and Indian Foreign Service (IFS), among others.
  • On the other hand, CITES, as mentioned earlier, stands for the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora.
  • It is an international agreement that regulates the international trade of endangered species to ensure their conservation and prevent their exploitation.
  • While the topics of environment and wildlife conservation may be part of the UPSC syllabus, there is no specific mention of CITES as a subject in the UPSC examinations. However,
  • it is advisable for UPSC aspirants to have a broad understanding of international agreements related to environment and wildlife conservation, including CITES,
  • as it falls under the purview of general knowledge and current affairs
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CITES Full Form

CITES Established

  • CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, was established on July 1, 1975. It entered into force 90 days later, on October 1, 1975. The convention was created as a result of a resolution adopted at a meeting of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) in 1963.
  • The initial meeting to draft the convention took place in Washington, D.C., in 1973, and subsequent negotiations were held leading up to its establishment in 1975. Since then, CITES has been continuously active in regulating and monitoring international trade to protect endangered species.

CITES Headquarters

  • The headquarters of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) is located in Geneva, Switzerland.
  • The Secretariat of CITES, which serves as the administrative body of the convention, is based in this headquarters.
  • The Secretariat facilitates the implementation of CITES by supporting member countries in their conservation efforts, providing guidance on the interpretation and application of the convention, and coordinating international cooperation on wildlife trade regulation.

CITES Convention

  • The CITES convention, also known as the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, is an international agreement aimed at regulating and monitoring the international trade of endangered species.
  • The convention was established to ensure that international trade does not threaten the survival of wild animals and plants.
  • CITES was adopted on March 3, 1973, and entered into force on July 1, 1975. It is implemented through a system of permits and certificates that regulate the import, export, and re-export of endangered species. The convention is based on three main objectives:

CITES Regulation:

  • CITES seeks to regulate international trade in endangered species through a system of controls and permits. It classifies species into three appendices based on their conservation status and the level of protection they require.

Conservation:

  • The primary goal of CITES is to contribute to the conservation of endangered species by ensuring that international trade does not harm their survival.
  • It promotes sustainable use of species and encourages member countries to adopt measures for the protection and management of their wildlife.

Sustainable Development:

  • CITES recognizes the importance of balancing the conservation of species with the socioeconomic needs of people.
  • It aims to promote sustainable development by considering the livelihoods of local communities and ensuring that trade in wildlife is legal, sustainable, and traceable.
  • CITES is legally binding for its member countries, which currently number 183.
  • Member countries are responsible for implementing the convention’s provisions within their jurisdictions and designating management and scientific authorities to enforce its regulations.
  • The convention also facilitate0s international cooperation and collaboration among member countries to combat illegal wildlife trade and protect endangered species.
  • CITES has played a significant role in conserving endangered species globally and has contributed to the protection of iconic species like elephants, rhinos, tigers, and others.
  • Through its regulations and enforcement mechanisms, CITES aims to safeguard the world’s biodiversity and ensure the sustainable use of wild fauna and flora for future generations.

CITES Appendix(CITES Full Form)

CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) classifies species into three different appendices based on their conservation status and the level of protection they require.

These appendices help determine the regulations and trade restrictions applied to the species listed under each category. Here is an overview of the CITES appendices:

1.Appendix I: This appendix includes species that are threatened with extinction.

Trade in specimens of these species is highly regulated and generally prohibited, except in exceptional circumstances.

The primary objective is to provide the highest level of protection to these species to ensure their survival. Examples of species listed in Appendix I are various species of great apes, tigers, elephants, certain marine turtles, and several orchid species.

2.Appendix II: Species listed under Appendix II are not necessarily facing extinction but may become threatened if their trade is not controlled.

Trade in these species is regulated through permits and quotas to ensure their sustainable use and avoid overexploitation.

It focuses on monitoring and regulating trade to ensure that it does not pose a significant threat to the species’ survival.

Examples of species listed in Appendix II include many parrot species, various species of sharks, African lions, and several tree species.

3.Appendix III: This appendix includes species that are protected in at least one country that has requested the cooperation of other CITES member countries to regulate their trade.

The listing in Appendix III is typically specific to a particular country or region.

When a member country adds a species to Appendix III, it requests assistance from other countries to control the trade of that species.

It facilitates collaboration and international support in protecting these species. The species listed in Appendix III vary depending on the requesting country’s needs and conservation priorities.

The categorization of species into the CITES appendices reflects the level of threat they face from international trade and the extent of protection they require.

The aim is to ensure that trade in endangered species is regulated, sustainable, and does not pose a significant risk to their survival in the wild.

Why was CITES Created

CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) was created with the primary objective of ensuring that international trade does not threaten the survival of wild animals and plants.

The convention was established to address concerns about the overexploitation and unsustainable trade of endangered species and to promote their conservation.

The key reasons behind the creation of CITES are as follows:

Conservation of Species:

One of the main motivations for creating CITES was to protect endangered species from overexploitation and potential extinction due to international trade. The convention aims to regulate and monitor trade to ensure the survival and sustainability of these species in their natural habitats.

International Cooperation:

CITES recognizes that the conservation of species requires global cooperation and coordinated efforts. By establishing a framework for international collaboration, CITES facilitates the exchange of information, expertise, and resources among member countries to combat illegal wildlife trade and implement effective conservation measures.

Sustainable Use of Resources:

CITES promotes the sustainable use of wild fauna and flora, recognizing that responsible and regulated trade can contribute to conservation efforts and support the livelihoods of local communities. The convention emphasizes the importance of balancing conservation objectives with the socioeconomic needs of people, particularly in communities dependent on wildlife resources.

Control of Trade:

CITES provides a mechanism for regulating international trade in endangered species through a system of permits and certificates. By placing restrictions on the import, export, and re-export of listed species, the convention aims to prevent the exploitation and unsustainable trade that can threaten their survival.

Public Awareness and Education:

CITES recognizes the significance of raising public awareness about the importance of conserving endangered species and the impacts of wildlife trade. The convention encourages educational initiatives and outreach programs to promote understanding, appreciation, and responsible behavior towards wildlife and their habitats.

Acronym/Full FormMeaning/Context
CITES Full FormConvention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora
CITES Full FormCity Information Technology Enhanced Services
CITES Full FormCollaborative Institutional Training Initiative
CITES Full FormCentre for Innovation, Incubation, and Entrepreneurship
CITES Full FormCenter for Information Technology and E-Governance
CITES Full FormCenter for Information Technology and Engineering Studies
CITES Full FormCenter for Innovation, Technology, and Entrepreneurship Studies
CITES Full FormClimate Impact and Tourism for Energy Services
CITES Full FormCombat Information Transport System

cites list

As of my knowledge cutoff in September 2021, there are thousands of species listed under the three appendices of CITES Full Form(Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora). It would be impractical to provide an exhaustive list of all the species covered by CITES.

The species listed under CITES are diverse and include various animals, plants, and their parts or derivatives.

To access the most up-to-date and comprehensive list of species protected by CITES, I recommend visiting the official CITES website (cites.org). They provide a searchable database called the CITES Species+ that allows you to explore the species covered by the convention. This database provides detailed information on the species’ scientific names, common names, and their CITES listing status (Appendix I, II, or III).

By using the CITES Species+ database, you can search for specific species, filter results by taxonomic group, or explore species by country or appendix listing.

This will help you access accurate and detailed information on the species protected by CITES and their conservation status.

Please note that the specific list of protected species may be subject to change as CITES periodically reviews and updates its appendices based on new scientific findings and conservation assessments. Therefore, it is important to refer to the official CITES resources for the most current and accurate information.

Overall,CITES Full Form

CITES was created to address the urgent need for international cooperation in conserving endangered species and controlling the trade that poses a threat to their survival. By regulating and monitoring international trade, CITES plays a vital role in ensuring the long-term viability of wild fauna and flora for future generations.

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